peashooter85:

The Model 1912 Mark II Royal Horse Artillery,
The semi automatic line of pistols introduced by Webley and Scott during the early 20th century.  The British military took little notice of the pistol, instead preferring to issue revolvers instead.  However there were a few exceptions.  The Model 1912 Mark I was adopted by the Royal Navy and used in limited amounts during World War I.  Also during World War I, a strange pistol carbine was adopted by the Royal Horse Artillery Regiments called the Model 1912 Mark II.
The Model 1912 Mark II was adopted by the Royal Horse Artillery because of its lightness and compact size.  With its detachable stock the weapon could be holstered like a pistol, but in a time of emergency be used like a long arm.  During World War I pistol carbines were quite popular with artillery units because of this feature, which allowed artillerymen to work their big guns without hindrance, yet still defend themselves if attacked by the enemy.  The Webley Model 1912 Mark I and Mark II was chambered in an automatic form of the old .455 Webley, which was called the .455 Webley Auto.  In terms of dimensions and performance it was similar to the .45 ACP.
Later in the war, the Webley Model 1912 Mark II was also adopted by the Royal Flying Corps. peashooter85:

The Model 1912 Mark II Royal Horse Artillery,
The semi automatic line of pistols introduced by Webley and Scott during the early 20th century.  The British military took little notice of the pistol, instead preferring to issue revolvers instead.  However there were a few exceptions.  The Model 1912 Mark I was adopted by the Royal Navy and used in limited amounts during World War I.  Also during World War I, a strange pistol carbine was adopted by the Royal Horse Artillery Regiments called the Model 1912 Mark II.
The Model 1912 Mark II was adopted by the Royal Horse Artillery because of its lightness and compact size.  With its detachable stock the weapon could be holstered like a pistol, but in a time of emergency be used like a long arm.  During World War I pistol carbines were quite popular with artillery units because of this feature, which allowed artillerymen to work their big guns without hindrance, yet still defend themselves if attacked by the enemy.  The Webley Model 1912 Mark I and Mark II was chambered in an automatic form of the old .455 Webley, which was called the .455 Webley Auto.  In terms of dimensions and performance it was similar to the .45 ACP.
Later in the war, the Webley Model 1912 Mark II was also adopted by the Royal Flying Corps. peashooter85:

The Model 1912 Mark II Royal Horse Artillery,
The semi automatic line of pistols introduced by Webley and Scott during the early 20th century.  The British military took little notice of the pistol, instead preferring to issue revolvers instead.  However there were a few exceptions.  The Model 1912 Mark I was adopted by the Royal Navy and used in limited amounts during World War I.  Also during World War I, a strange pistol carbine was adopted by the Royal Horse Artillery Regiments called the Model 1912 Mark II.
The Model 1912 Mark II was adopted by the Royal Horse Artillery because of its lightness and compact size.  With its detachable stock the weapon could be holstered like a pistol, but in a time of emergency be used like a long arm.  During World War I pistol carbines were quite popular with artillery units because of this feature, which allowed artillerymen to work their big guns without hindrance, yet still defend themselves if attacked by the enemy.  The Webley Model 1912 Mark I and Mark II was chambered in an automatic form of the old .455 Webley, which was called the .455 Webley Auto.  In terms of dimensions and performance it was similar to the .45 ACP.
Later in the war, the Webley Model 1912 Mark II was also adopted by the Royal Flying Corps. peashooter85:

The Model 1912 Mark II Royal Horse Artillery,
The semi automatic line of pistols introduced by Webley and Scott during the early 20th century.  The British military took little notice of the pistol, instead preferring to issue revolvers instead.  However there were a few exceptions.  The Model 1912 Mark I was adopted by the Royal Navy and used in limited amounts during World War I.  Also during World War I, a strange pistol carbine was adopted by the Royal Horse Artillery Regiments called the Model 1912 Mark II.
The Model 1912 Mark II was adopted by the Royal Horse Artillery because of its lightness and compact size.  With its detachable stock the weapon could be holstered like a pistol, but in a time of emergency be used like a long arm.  During World War I pistol carbines were quite popular with artillery units because of this feature, which allowed artillerymen to work their big guns without hindrance, yet still defend themselves if attacked by the enemy.  The Webley Model 1912 Mark I and Mark II was chambered in an automatic form of the old .455 Webley, which was called the .455 Webley Auto.  In terms of dimensions and performance it was similar to the .45 ACP.
Later in the war, the Webley Model 1912 Mark II was also adopted by the Royal Flying Corps.

peashooter85:

The Model 1912 Mark II Royal Horse Artillery,

The semi automatic line of pistols introduced by Webley and Scott during the early 20th century.  The British military took little notice of the pistol, instead preferring to issue revolvers instead.  However there were a few exceptions.  The Model 1912 Mark I was adopted by the Royal Navy and used in limited amounts during World War I.  Also during World War I, a strange pistol carbine was adopted by the Royal Horse Artillery Regiments called the Model 1912 Mark II.

The Model 1912 Mark II was adopted by the Royal Horse Artillery because of its lightness and compact size.  With its detachable stock the weapon could be holstered like a pistol, but in a time of emergency be used like a long arm.  During World War I pistol carbines were quite popular with artillery units because of this feature, which allowed artillerymen to work their big guns without hindrance, yet still defend themselves if attacked by the enemy.  The Webley Model 1912 Mark I and Mark II was chambered in an automatic form of the old .455 Webley, which was called the .455 Webley Auto.  In terms of dimensions and performance it was similar to the .45 ACP.

Later in the war, the Webley Model 1912 Mark II was also adopted by the Royal Flying Corps.

(TRG -Tactical Rubber Gun-から) (TRG -Tactical Rubber Gun-から)
RC BERG LTD.
89R-TRG (トレーニング・ラバーガン)
全長:920mm(実銃の89式小銃に相当)重量:3.7kg(参考値)※二脚は付属しません。材質:ポリウレタン樹脂(ゴム物性)内部に鉄芯入り価格:39,900円(消費税含む) RC BERG LTD.
89R-TRG (トレーニング・ラバーガン)
全長:920mm(実銃の89式小銃に相当)重量:3.7kg(参考値)※二脚は付属しません。材質:ポリウレタン樹脂(ゴム物性)内部に鉄芯入り価格:39,900円(消費税含む)

RC BERG LTD.

89R-TRG
(トレーニング・ラバーガン)

全長:920mm(実銃の89式小銃に相当)
重量:3.7kg(参考値)※二脚は付属しません。
材質:ポリウレタン樹脂(ゴム物性)内部に鉄芯入り
価格:39,900円(消費税含む)

DVIDS - Images - Japan Observer Exchange Program [Image 16 of 27]
U.S. Marines with Company L, Battalion Landing Team, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (31st MEU) and Soldiers from the Western Army Japan Ground Self Defense Force (JGSDF) practice small unit level techniques and procedures as part of the Japan Observer Exchange Program on Kin, Okinawa, Japan, July 16, 2014. The JGSDF was integrated with the 31st MEU in order to better understand amphibious operations. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by GySgt Ismael Pea/ Released) DVIDS - Images - Japan Observer Exchange Program [Image 16 of 27]
U.S. Marines with Company L, Battalion Landing Team, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (31st MEU) and Soldiers from the Western Army Japan Ground Self Defense Force (JGSDF) practice small unit level techniques and procedures as part of the Japan Observer Exchange Program on Kin, Okinawa, Japan, July 16, 2014. The JGSDF was integrated with the 31st MEU in order to better understand amphibious operations. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by GySgt Ismael Pea/ Released)

DVIDS - Images - Japan Observer Exchange Program [Image 16 of 27]

U.S. Marines with Company L, Battalion Landing Team, 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit (31st MEU) and Soldiers from the Western Army Japan Ground Self Defense Force (JGSDF) practice small unit level techniques and procedures as part of the Japan Observer Exchange Program on Kin, Okinawa, Japan, July 16, 2014. The JGSDF was integrated with the 31st MEU in order to better understand amphibious operations. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by GySgt Ismael Pea/ Released)

Blue FNH SCAR16S - The Firearm Blog
Not exaclty new but for those who don’t follow 3Gun, FNH has a one of a kind Blue Anodized SCAR 16S. I saw it during my first year staffing the 2012 FNH 3Gun Match at Peacemaker National Training Center. If you notice, the laser engraved markings are all there. So this upper receiver was not coated afterwards. I asked the owner how he has a Blue SCAR. He is an employee at FNH and he said he went to production, took one of the SCAR 16S uppers, before it was coated black or tan, and took it to the guys who were coating the SLP competition shotguns. He told them to coat this too. Then of course it went to laser engraving to have all the factory markings engraved. - See more at: http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2014/07/24/blue-fnh-scar16s/?utm_source=feedly&utm_reader=feedly&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=rss#sthash.O7uE8Bk6.dpuf Blue FNH SCAR16S - The Firearm Blog
Not exaclty new but for those who don’t follow 3Gun, FNH has a one of a kind Blue Anodized SCAR 16S. I saw it during my first year staffing the 2012 FNH 3Gun Match at Peacemaker National Training Center. If you notice, the laser engraved markings are all there. So this upper receiver was not coated afterwards. I asked the owner how he has a Blue SCAR. He is an employee at FNH and he said he went to production, took one of the SCAR 16S uppers, before it was coated black or tan, and took it to the guys who were coating the SLP competition shotguns. He told them to coat this too. Then of course it went to laser engraving to have all the factory markings engraved. - See more at: http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2014/07/24/blue-fnh-scar16s/?utm_source=feedly&utm_reader=feedly&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=rss#sthash.O7uE8Bk6.dpuf Blue FNH SCAR16S - The Firearm Blog
Not exaclty new but for those who don’t follow 3Gun, FNH has a one of a kind Blue Anodized SCAR 16S. I saw it during my first year staffing the 2012 FNH 3Gun Match at Peacemaker National Training Center. If you notice, the laser engraved markings are all there. So this upper receiver was not coated afterwards. I asked the owner how he has a Blue SCAR. He is an employee at FNH and he said he went to production, took one of the SCAR 16S uppers, before it was coated black or tan, and took it to the guys who were coating the SLP competition shotguns. He told them to coat this too. Then of course it went to laser engraving to have all the factory markings engraved. - See more at: http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2014/07/24/blue-fnh-scar16s/?utm_source=feedly&utm_reader=feedly&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=rss#sthash.O7uE8Bk6.dpuf

Blue FNH SCAR16S - The Firearm Blog

Not exaclty new but for those who don’t follow 3Gun, FNH has a one of a kind Blue Anodized SCAR 16S. I saw it during my first year staffing the 2012 FNH 3Gun Match at Peacemaker National Training Center. If you notice, the laser engraved markings are all there. So this upper receiver was not coated afterwards. I asked the owner how he has a Blue SCAR. He is an employee at FNH and he said he went to production, took one of the SCAR 16S uppers, before it was coated black or tan, and took it to the guys who were coating the SLP competition shotguns. He told them to coat this too. Then of course it went to laser engraving to have all the factory markings engraved. - See more at: http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2014/07/24/blue-fnh-scar16s/?utm_source=feedly&utm_reader=feedly&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=rss#sthash.O7uE8Bk6.dpuf

This Week’s Photos!! Tuesday July 22nd - Saturday July 26th 2014 - Page 3
Colombian Navy
Colombian sailors, pilots, marines, divers, snipers, coast guards and naval military personell participated in the Military Parade in Bogota, Colombia during the celebrations of the Aniversary of the Independence Day, last sunday July 20th 2014 This Week’s Photos!! Tuesday July 22nd - Saturday July 26th 2014 - Page 3
Colombian Navy
Colombian sailors, pilots, marines, divers, snipers, coast guards and naval military personell participated in the Military Parade in Bogota, Colombia during the celebrations of the Aniversary of the Independence Day, last sunday July 20th 2014 This Week’s Photos!! Tuesday July 22nd - Saturday July 26th 2014 - Page 3
Colombian Navy
Colombian sailors, pilots, marines, divers, snipers, coast guards and naval military personell participated in the Military Parade in Bogota, Colombia during the celebrations of the Aniversary of the Independence Day, last sunday July 20th 2014 This Week’s Photos!! Tuesday July 22nd - Saturday July 26th 2014 - Page 3
Colombian Navy
Colombian sailors, pilots, marines, divers, snipers, coast guards and naval military personell participated in the Military Parade in Bogota, Colombia during the celebrations of the Aniversary of the Independence Day, last sunday July 20th 2014

This Week’s Photos!! Tuesday July 22nd - Saturday July 26th 2014 - Page 3

Colombian Navy

Colombian sailors, pilots, marines, divers, snipers, coast guards and naval military personell participated in the Military Parade in Bogota, Colombia during the celebrations of the Aniversary of the Independence Day, last sunday July 20th 2014

Fuerzas Comando 2014  Snipers from 17 different nations zero their weapon systems during a sniper validation event, July 21 at the Colombian National Training Center in Fort Tolemaida, Colombia. The event was conducted in preparation for Exercise Fuerzas Comando 2014. This event is aimed at enhancing training and strengthening regional and multinational cooperation, mutual trust, readiness and interoperability of special operations forces in the region. Special Operations Command South serves as the U.S. execution agent for the exercise. (Department of Defense photo by Master Sgt. Alex Licea, Special Operations Command South Public Affairs) Fuerzas Comando 2014  Snipers from 17 different nations zero their weapon systems during a sniper validation event, July 21 at the Colombian National Training Center in Fort Tolemaida, Colombia. The event was conducted in preparation for Exercise Fuerzas Comando 2014. This event is aimed at enhancing training and strengthening regional and multinational cooperation, mutual trust, readiness and interoperability of special operations forces in the region. Special Operations Command South serves as the U.S. execution agent for the exercise. (Department of Defense photo by Master Sgt. Alex Licea, Special Operations Command South Public Affairs) Fuerzas Comando 2014  Snipers from 17 different nations zero their weapon systems during a sniper validation event, July 21 at the Colombian National Training Center in Fort Tolemaida, Colombia. The event was conducted in preparation for Exercise Fuerzas Comando 2014. This event is aimed at enhancing training and strengthening regional and multinational cooperation, mutual trust, readiness and interoperability of special operations forces in the region. Special Operations Command South serves as the U.S. execution agent for the exercise. (Department of Defense photo by Master Sgt. Alex Licea, Special Operations Command South Public Affairs) Fuerzas Comando 2014  Snipers from 17 different nations zero their weapon systems during a sniper validation event, July 21 at the Colombian National Training Center in Fort Tolemaida, Colombia. The event was conducted in preparation for Exercise Fuerzas Comando 2014. This event is aimed at enhancing training and strengthening regional and multinational cooperation, mutual trust, readiness and interoperability of special operations forces in the region. Special Operations Command South serves as the U.S. execution agent for the exercise. (Department of Defense photo by Master Sgt. Alex Licea, Special Operations Command South Public Affairs) Fuerzas Comando 2014  Snipers from 17 different nations zero their weapon systems during a sniper validation event, July 21 at the Colombian National Training Center in Fort Tolemaida, Colombia. The event was conducted in preparation for Exercise Fuerzas Comando 2014. This event is aimed at enhancing training and strengthening regional and multinational cooperation, mutual trust, readiness and interoperability of special operations forces in the region. Special Operations Command South serves as the U.S. execution agent for the exercise. (Department of Defense photo by Master Sgt. Alex Licea, Special Operations Command South Public Affairs) Fuerzas Comando 2014  Snipers from 17 different nations zero their weapon systems during a sniper validation event, July 21 at the Colombian National Training Center in Fort Tolemaida, Colombia. The event was conducted in preparation for Exercise Fuerzas Comando 2014. This event is aimed at enhancing training and strengthening regional and multinational cooperation, mutual trust, readiness and interoperability of special operations forces in the region. Special Operations Command South serves as the U.S. execution agent for the exercise. (Department of Defense photo by Master Sgt. Alex Licea, Special Operations Command South Public Affairs) Fuerzas Comando 2014  Snipers from 17 different nations zero their weapon systems during a sniper validation event, July 21 at the Colombian National Training Center in Fort Tolemaida, Colombia. The event was conducted in preparation for Exercise Fuerzas Comando 2014. This event is aimed at enhancing training and strengthening regional and multinational cooperation, mutual trust, readiness and interoperability of special operations forces in the region. Special Operations Command South serves as the U.S. execution agent for the exercise. (Department of Defense photo by Master Sgt. Alex Licea, Special Operations Command South Public Affairs) Fuerzas Comando 2014  Snipers from 17 different nations zero their weapon systems during a sniper validation event, July 21 at the Colombian National Training Center in Fort Tolemaida, Colombia. The event was conducted in preparation for Exercise Fuerzas Comando 2014. This event is aimed at enhancing training and strengthening regional and multinational cooperation, mutual trust, readiness and interoperability of special operations forces in the region. Special Operations Command South serves as the U.S. execution agent for the exercise. (Department of Defense photo by Master Sgt. Alex Licea, Special Operations Command South Public Affairs)

Fuerzas Comando 2014 
Snipers from 17 different nations zero their weapon systems during a sniper validation event, July 21 at the Colombian National Training Center in Fort Tolemaida, Colombia. The event was conducted in preparation for Exercise Fuerzas Comando 2014. This event is aimed at enhancing training and strengthening regional and multinational cooperation, mutual trust, readiness and interoperability of special operations forces in the region. Special Operations Command South serves as the U.S. execution agent for the exercise. (Department of Defense photo by Master Sgt. Alex Licea, Special Operations Command South Public Affairs)

unkoer:

魔法使いTai! (3) 原画セット - ヤフオク! unkoer:

魔法使いTai! (3) 原画セット - ヤフオク! unkoer:

魔法使いTai! (3) 原画セット - ヤフオク!
unkoer:

魔法使いTai! (5) 原画セット - ヤフオク! unkoer:

魔法使いTai! (5) 原画セット - ヤフオク! unkoer:

魔法使いTai! (5) 原画セット - ヤフオク!
United States Marine Corps  Scout snipers with Weapons Company, 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, Marine Rotational Force - Darwin, performs a live-fire shoot during a crew-served weapons competition aboard Mount Bundey Training Area, June 19, 2014. The competition was designed to test the Marines’ proficiency with various weapons systems including the SMAW, 81mm Mortar and the M240 medium machine-gun. The Marines with MRF-D will conduct independent and bilateral training with the Australian Defence Force aboard existing ADF facilities during the six-month rotation. United States Marine Corps  Scout snipers with Weapons Company, 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, Marine Rotational Force - Darwin, performs a live-fire shoot during a crew-served weapons competition aboard Mount Bundey Training Area, June 19, 2014. The competition was designed to test the Marines’ proficiency with various weapons systems including the SMAW, 81mm Mortar and the M240 medium machine-gun. The Marines with MRF-D will conduct independent and bilateral training with the Australian Defence Force aboard existing ADF facilities during the six-month rotation.

United States Marine Corps
Scout snipers with Weapons Company, 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, Marine Rotational Force - Darwin, performs a live-fire shoot during a crew-served weapons competition aboard Mount Bundey Training Area, June 19, 2014. The competition was designed to test the Marines’ proficiency with various weapons systems including the SMAW, 81mm Mortar and the M240 medium machine-gun. The Marines with MRF-D will conduct independent and bilateral training with the Australian Defence Force aboard existing ADF facilities during the six-month rotation.

M4 Carbine Gets A Makeover

In footage taken at Ft. Riley, KS, Program Executive Office Soldier’s Product Manager Individual Weapons explains what it is doing to “up-gun” its standard carbine. Changes include adding an automatic trigger and heavier barrel, and making the gun more ergonomic. Once an M4 undergoes these modifications, it becomes an M4A1. All M4s in the Army inventory are scheduled for upgrading.

serbianarmyforces:

Противтерористичка Јединица, ПТЈ.Protivteroristička Jedinica, PTJ.Counter Terrorist Unit, CTU.

serbianarmyforces:

Противтерористичка Јединица, ПТЈ.

Protivteroristička Jedinica, PTJ.

Counter Terrorist Unit, CTU.