Heckler & Koch - HK, THE HISTORY BOOK

30mm high explosive grenade launcher with 6 round capacity on top, and 5.56 rifle with 30 round capacity on bottom, The OICW was game changing. HK History Book Pg 360.

Ashbury Precision Ordnance

M14 EBR-SABER Hybrid
From the ever creative mind and camera lens of professional photographer Yamil Sued. Here’s an APO Custom Shop M14 in a Sage International Ltd EBR chassis with an APO folding Push Button Adjustable Hybrid (PBA-H) shoulder stock. This time tested and battle proven rifle is topped off with a Leupold Mark 4 LR/T 6.5-20x50mm M1 and finished in Cerakote H-265 Flat Dark Earth.

SEALs - Page 481
A U.S. Navy SEAL lowers an elite canine into a rigid-hulled inflatable boat set to depart the littoral combat ship USS Independence (LCS 2) during a training mission for Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) Exercise 2014. Twenty-two nations, 49 ships and six submarines, more than 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 26 to Aug. 1 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. The world’s largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world’s oceans. RIMPAC 2014 is the 24th exercise in the series that began in 1971. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Corey T. Jones/Released) SEALs - Page 481
A U.S. Navy SEAL lowers an elite canine into a rigid-hulled inflatable boat set to depart the littoral combat ship USS Independence (LCS 2) during a training mission for Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) Exercise 2014. Twenty-two nations, 49 ships and six submarines, more than 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 26 to Aug. 1 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. The world’s largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world’s oceans. RIMPAC 2014 is the 24th exercise in the series that began in 1971. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Corey T. Jones/Released)

SEALs - Page 481

A U.S. Navy SEAL lowers an elite canine into a rigid-hulled inflatable boat set to depart the littoral combat ship USS Independence (LCS 2) during a training mission for Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) Exercise 2014. Twenty-two nations, 49 ships and six submarines, more than 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 26 to Aug. 1 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. The world’s largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world’s oceans. RIMPAC 2014 is the 24th exercise in the series that began in 1971. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Corey T. Jones/Released)

DVIDS - Images - Pacific Warriors – JGSDF observe Marines
July 16. The soldiers are with JGSDF’s Western Army and the Marines are with Company L, Battalion Landing Team 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit. The JGSDF soldiers have been observing L Co. for approximately six weeks. JOEP enables the JGSDF observation and education of small unit concepts, tactics, and amphibious operations to further enhance the interoperability of the two forces and security of the region. (U.S. Marine Photo by Cpl. Henry Antenor) DVIDS - Images - Pacific Warriors – JGSDF observe Marines
July 16. The soldiers are with JGSDF’s Western Army and the Marines are with Company L, Battalion Landing Team 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit. The JGSDF soldiers have been observing L Co. for approximately six weeks. JOEP enables the JGSDF observation and education of small unit concepts, tactics, and amphibious operations to further enhance the interoperability of the two forces and security of the region. (U.S. Marine Photo by Cpl. Henry Antenor) DVIDS - Images - Pacific Warriors – JGSDF observe Marines
July 16. The soldiers are with JGSDF’s Western Army and the Marines are with Company L, Battalion Landing Team 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit. The JGSDF soldiers have been observing L Co. for approximately six weeks. JOEP enables the JGSDF observation and education of small unit concepts, tactics, and amphibious operations to further enhance the interoperability of the two forces and security of the region. (U.S. Marine Photo by Cpl. Henry Antenor) DVIDS - Images - Pacific Warriors – JGSDF observe Marines
July 16. The soldiers are with JGSDF’s Western Army and the Marines are with Company L, Battalion Landing Team 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit. The JGSDF soldiers have been observing L Co. for approximately six weeks. JOEP enables the JGSDF observation and education of small unit concepts, tactics, and amphibious operations to further enhance the interoperability of the two forces and security of the region. (U.S. Marine Photo by Cpl. Henry Antenor) DVIDS - Images - Pacific Warriors – JGSDF observe Marines
July 16. The soldiers are with JGSDF’s Western Army and the Marines are with Company L, Battalion Landing Team 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit. The JGSDF soldiers have been observing L Co. for approximately six weeks. JOEP enables the JGSDF observation and education of small unit concepts, tactics, and amphibious operations to further enhance the interoperability of the two forces and security of the region. (U.S. Marine Photo by Cpl. Henry Antenor) DVIDS - Images - Pacific Warriors – JGSDF observe Marines
July 16. The soldiers are with JGSDF’s Western Army and the Marines are with Company L, Battalion Landing Team 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit. The JGSDF soldiers have been observing L Co. for approximately six weeks. JOEP enables the JGSDF observation and education of small unit concepts, tactics, and amphibious operations to further enhance the interoperability of the two forces and security of the region. (U.S. Marine Photo by Cpl. Henry Antenor) DVIDS - Images - Pacific Warriors – JGSDF observe Marines
July 16. The soldiers are with JGSDF’s Western Army and the Marines are with Company L, Battalion Landing Team 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit. The JGSDF soldiers have been observing L Co. for approximately six weeks. JOEP enables the JGSDF observation and education of small unit concepts, tactics, and amphibious operations to further enhance the interoperability of the two forces and security of the region. (U.S. Marine Photo by Cpl. Henry Antenor) DVIDS - Images - Pacific Warriors – JGSDF observe Marines
July 16. The soldiers are with JGSDF’s Western Army and the Marines are with Company L, Battalion Landing Team 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit. The JGSDF soldiers have been observing L Co. for approximately six weeks. JOEP enables the JGSDF observation and education of small unit concepts, tactics, and amphibious operations to further enhance the interoperability of the two forces and security of the region. (U.S. Marine Photo by Cpl. Henry Antenor) DVIDS - Images - Pacific Warriors – JGSDF observe Marines
July 16. The soldiers are with JGSDF’s Western Army and the Marines are with Company L, Battalion Landing Team 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit. The JGSDF soldiers have been observing L Co. for approximately six weeks. JOEP enables the JGSDF observation and education of small unit concepts, tactics, and amphibious operations to further enhance the interoperability of the two forces and security of the region. (U.S. Marine Photo by Cpl. Henry Antenor) DVIDS - Images - Pacific Warriors – JGSDF observe Marines
July 16. The soldiers are with JGSDF’s Western Army and the Marines are with Company L, Battalion Landing Team 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit. The JGSDF soldiers have been observing L Co. for approximately six weeks. JOEP enables the JGSDF observation and education of small unit concepts, tactics, and amphibious operations to further enhance the interoperability of the two forces and security of the region. (U.S. Marine Photo by Cpl. Henry Antenor)

DVIDS - Images - Pacific Warriors – JGSDF observe Marines

July 16. The soldiers are with JGSDF’s Western Army and the Marines are with Company L, Battalion Landing Team 3rd Battalion, 5th Marines, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit. The JGSDF soldiers have been observing L Co. for approximately six weeks. JOEP enables the JGSDF observation and education of small unit concepts, tactics, and amphibious operations to further enhance the interoperability of the two forces and security of the region. (U.S. Marine Photo by Cpl. Henry Antenor)

Spartan Soldier with M-240 7.62mm Medium Machine Gun
A Spartan Soldier of Bandit Troop, 3rd Squadron 71st Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry) mans his position May 4, during his unit’s mission of providing security for a joint Afghan and U.S. Forces security meeting in the Chamkani district of Paktia Province in Afghanistan. The Spartan Brigade is currently deployed to Afghanistan as a Security Forces Advise Assist Brigade in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Javier Amador, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division Public Affairs) (Released)

대한민국 국군 Republic of Korea Armed Forces
2014.7.16. 해병대 6여단, 팀 기동사격훈련 16th, juiy, 2014. Team maneuver firing exercise of ROK Marine 6th Brigade 대한민국 국군 Republic of Korea Armed Forces
2014.7.16. 해병대 6여단, 팀 기동사격훈련 16th, juiy, 2014. Team maneuver firing exercise of ROK Marine 6th Brigade 대한민국 국군 Republic of Korea Armed Forces
2014.7.16. 해병대 6여단, 팀 기동사격훈련 16th, juiy, 2014. Team maneuver firing exercise of ROK Marine 6th Brigade 대한민국 국군 Republic of Korea Armed Forces
2014.7.16. 해병대 6여단, 팀 기동사격훈련 16th, juiy, 2014. Team maneuver firing exercise of ROK Marine 6th Brigade

대한민국 국군 Republic of Korea Armed Forces

2014.7.16. 해병대 6여단, 팀 기동사격훈련 16th, juiy, 2014. Team maneuver firing exercise of ROK Marine 6th Brigade

ca-tsuka:

Gundam G no Reconguista character-designs by Kenichi Yoshida (Eureka Seven), who is also one of the greatest japanese animator (he worked a lot for Ghibli).
ca-tsuka:

Gundam G no Reconguista character-designs by Kenichi Yoshida (Eureka Seven), who is also one of the greatest japanese animator (he worked a lot for Ghibli).
ca-tsuka:

Gundam G no Reconguista character-designs by Kenichi Yoshida (Eureka Seven), who is also one of the greatest japanese animator (he worked a lot for Ghibli).
ca-tsuka:

Gundam G no Reconguista character-designs by Kenichi Yoshida (Eureka Seven), who is also one of the greatest japanese animator (he worked a lot for Ghibli).
ca-tsuka:

Gundam G no Reconguista character-designs by Kenichi Yoshida (Eureka Seven), who is also one of the greatest japanese animator (he worked a lot for Ghibli).
ca-tsuka:

Gundam G no Reconguista character-designs by Kenichi Yoshida (Eureka Seven), who is also one of the greatest japanese animator (he worked a lot for Ghibli).
ca-tsuka:

Gundam G no Reconguista character-designs by Kenichi Yoshida (Eureka Seven), who is also one of the greatest japanese animator (he worked a lot for Ghibli).

ca-tsuka:

Gundam G no Reconguista character-designs by Kenichi Yoshida (Eureka Seven), who is also one of the greatest japanese animator (he worked a lot for Ghibli).

US Model 45A « Forgotten Weapons
by Tom Laemlein
A couple of years ago, I wrote a short article for Small Arms Review magazine on the strangely futuristic “Model 45A”, which was the subject of a group of photos by a US Army photographer. Apparently this rifle was a one-off developed by a group of Army Ordnance men stationed in the Philippines during 1945, and as bizarre as its modern features the Model 45A attracted the attention of a Signal Corps photographer. The rifle ended up being the subject of at least two “photo-shoots” in immediate post-war Manila.
Although there is no way to know for sure, it is unlikely that Model 45A was actually capable of firing. That has been the opinion of several gun writers—at least given the only evidence we have, which are the photos. Consensus of opinion on the Model 45A has been consistent in at least one aspect: the rifle concept presents many forward-thinking ideas in small arms design. The elusive idea of creating an infantry arm that fulfills multiple roles using the same cartridge was alive and well in 1945.
Here’s a short breakdown on what I see in this design: The Model 45A is a modern-looking “Bullpup” design, with a noticeably long barrel. A Browning Automatic Rifle magazine has been used and we can safely assume that the Model 45A was chambered for standard .30 caliber ammunition. The pistol grip is futuristic looking for 1945, but the receiver cover looks rather crude and flimsy, and this is likely why the Model 45A is probably not a live gun. The scope integrated inside the carry handle (very much reminiscent of a modern Steyr-AUG design) is unidentified. The Model 45A is even equipped to launch the M9A1 anti-tank rifle grenade. Produced in the Philippines, it carries with it that country’s long history of hand-made firearms and unique designs.
As a photo researcher, I found it quite curious that so many photos were taken of the Model 45A, and that the official captions on the Signal Corps images provided so much information (such as it was) about the rifle. Ultimately, it had the “feel” of a marketing effort. Apparently the Ordnance crew that developed this concept didn’t realize that any designs you come up with while in the employ of Uncle Sam are destined to be US Government property without additional compensation to the designer. If they had dreamed of financial gain by selling the plans of the Model 45A to the Army, it never happened—and never really had any chance of happening anyway.
I find the futuristic appearance of the weapon to be particularly interesting, and the Model 45A goes to prove an important point: American ingenuity knows no bounds!
If ever there was a “forgotten weapon” it is the Model 45A. Maybe one of the readers of this site can share shed some more light on this fascinating concept, developed in the field all those years ago. US Model 45A « Forgotten Weapons
by Tom Laemlein
A couple of years ago, I wrote a short article for Small Arms Review magazine on the strangely futuristic “Model 45A”, which was the subject of a group of photos by a US Army photographer. Apparently this rifle was a one-off developed by a group of Army Ordnance men stationed in the Philippines during 1945, and as bizarre as its modern features the Model 45A attracted the attention of a Signal Corps photographer. The rifle ended up being the subject of at least two “photo-shoots” in immediate post-war Manila.
Although there is no way to know for sure, it is unlikely that Model 45A was actually capable of firing. That has been the opinion of several gun writers—at least given the only evidence we have, which are the photos. Consensus of opinion on the Model 45A has been consistent in at least one aspect: the rifle concept presents many forward-thinking ideas in small arms design. The elusive idea of creating an infantry arm that fulfills multiple roles using the same cartridge was alive and well in 1945.
Here’s a short breakdown on what I see in this design: The Model 45A is a modern-looking “Bullpup” design, with a noticeably long barrel. A Browning Automatic Rifle magazine has been used and we can safely assume that the Model 45A was chambered for standard .30 caliber ammunition. The pistol grip is futuristic looking for 1945, but the receiver cover looks rather crude and flimsy, and this is likely why the Model 45A is probably not a live gun. The scope integrated inside the carry handle (very much reminiscent of a modern Steyr-AUG design) is unidentified. The Model 45A is even equipped to launch the M9A1 anti-tank rifle grenade. Produced in the Philippines, it carries with it that country’s long history of hand-made firearms and unique designs.
As a photo researcher, I found it quite curious that so many photos were taken of the Model 45A, and that the official captions on the Signal Corps images provided so much information (such as it was) about the rifle. Ultimately, it had the “feel” of a marketing effort. Apparently the Ordnance crew that developed this concept didn’t realize that any designs you come up with while in the employ of Uncle Sam are destined to be US Government property without additional compensation to the designer. If they had dreamed of financial gain by selling the plans of the Model 45A to the Army, it never happened—and never really had any chance of happening anyway.
I find the futuristic appearance of the weapon to be particularly interesting, and the Model 45A goes to prove an important point: American ingenuity knows no bounds!
If ever there was a “forgotten weapon” it is the Model 45A. Maybe one of the readers of this site can share shed some more light on this fascinating concept, developed in the field all those years ago. US Model 45A « Forgotten Weapons
by Tom Laemlein
A couple of years ago, I wrote a short article for Small Arms Review magazine on the strangely futuristic “Model 45A”, which was the subject of a group of photos by a US Army photographer. Apparently this rifle was a one-off developed by a group of Army Ordnance men stationed in the Philippines during 1945, and as bizarre as its modern features the Model 45A attracted the attention of a Signal Corps photographer. The rifle ended up being the subject of at least two “photo-shoots” in immediate post-war Manila.
Although there is no way to know for sure, it is unlikely that Model 45A was actually capable of firing. That has been the opinion of several gun writers—at least given the only evidence we have, which are the photos. Consensus of opinion on the Model 45A has been consistent in at least one aspect: the rifle concept presents many forward-thinking ideas in small arms design. The elusive idea of creating an infantry arm that fulfills multiple roles using the same cartridge was alive and well in 1945.
Here’s a short breakdown on what I see in this design: The Model 45A is a modern-looking “Bullpup” design, with a noticeably long barrel. A Browning Automatic Rifle magazine has been used and we can safely assume that the Model 45A was chambered for standard .30 caliber ammunition. The pistol grip is futuristic looking for 1945, but the receiver cover looks rather crude and flimsy, and this is likely why the Model 45A is probably not a live gun. The scope integrated inside the carry handle (very much reminiscent of a modern Steyr-AUG design) is unidentified. The Model 45A is even equipped to launch the M9A1 anti-tank rifle grenade. Produced in the Philippines, it carries with it that country’s long history of hand-made firearms and unique designs.
As a photo researcher, I found it quite curious that so many photos were taken of the Model 45A, and that the official captions on the Signal Corps images provided so much information (such as it was) about the rifle. Ultimately, it had the “feel” of a marketing effort. Apparently the Ordnance crew that developed this concept didn’t realize that any designs you come up with while in the employ of Uncle Sam are destined to be US Government property without additional compensation to the designer. If they had dreamed of financial gain by selling the plans of the Model 45A to the Army, it never happened—and never really had any chance of happening anyway.
I find the futuristic appearance of the weapon to be particularly interesting, and the Model 45A goes to prove an important point: American ingenuity knows no bounds!
If ever there was a “forgotten weapon” it is the Model 45A. Maybe one of the readers of this site can share shed some more light on this fascinating concept, developed in the field all those years ago. US Model 45A « Forgotten Weapons
by Tom Laemlein
A couple of years ago, I wrote a short article for Small Arms Review magazine on the strangely futuristic “Model 45A”, which was the subject of a group of photos by a US Army photographer. Apparently this rifle was a one-off developed by a group of Army Ordnance men stationed in the Philippines during 1945, and as bizarre as its modern features the Model 45A attracted the attention of a Signal Corps photographer. The rifle ended up being the subject of at least two “photo-shoots” in immediate post-war Manila.
Although there is no way to know for sure, it is unlikely that Model 45A was actually capable of firing. That has been the opinion of several gun writers—at least given the only evidence we have, which are the photos. Consensus of opinion on the Model 45A has been consistent in at least one aspect: the rifle concept presents many forward-thinking ideas in small arms design. The elusive idea of creating an infantry arm that fulfills multiple roles using the same cartridge was alive and well in 1945.
Here’s a short breakdown on what I see in this design: The Model 45A is a modern-looking “Bullpup” design, with a noticeably long barrel. A Browning Automatic Rifle magazine has been used and we can safely assume that the Model 45A was chambered for standard .30 caliber ammunition. The pistol grip is futuristic looking for 1945, but the receiver cover looks rather crude and flimsy, and this is likely why the Model 45A is probably not a live gun. The scope integrated inside the carry handle (very much reminiscent of a modern Steyr-AUG design) is unidentified. The Model 45A is even equipped to launch the M9A1 anti-tank rifle grenade. Produced in the Philippines, it carries with it that country’s long history of hand-made firearms and unique designs.
As a photo researcher, I found it quite curious that so many photos were taken of the Model 45A, and that the official captions on the Signal Corps images provided so much information (such as it was) about the rifle. Ultimately, it had the “feel” of a marketing effort. Apparently the Ordnance crew that developed this concept didn’t realize that any designs you come up with while in the employ of Uncle Sam are destined to be US Government property without additional compensation to the designer. If they had dreamed of financial gain by selling the plans of the Model 45A to the Army, it never happened—and never really had any chance of happening anyway.
I find the futuristic appearance of the weapon to be particularly interesting, and the Model 45A goes to prove an important point: American ingenuity knows no bounds!
If ever there was a “forgotten weapon” it is the Model 45A. Maybe one of the readers of this site can share shed some more light on this fascinating concept, developed in the field all those years ago. US Model 45A « Forgotten Weapons
by Tom Laemlein
A couple of years ago, I wrote a short article for Small Arms Review magazine on the strangely futuristic “Model 45A”, which was the subject of a group of photos by a US Army photographer. Apparently this rifle was a one-off developed by a group of Army Ordnance men stationed in the Philippines during 1945, and as bizarre as its modern features the Model 45A attracted the attention of a Signal Corps photographer. The rifle ended up being the subject of at least two “photo-shoots” in immediate post-war Manila.
Although there is no way to know for sure, it is unlikely that Model 45A was actually capable of firing. That has been the opinion of several gun writers—at least given the only evidence we have, which are the photos. Consensus of opinion on the Model 45A has been consistent in at least one aspect: the rifle concept presents many forward-thinking ideas in small arms design. The elusive idea of creating an infantry arm that fulfills multiple roles using the same cartridge was alive and well in 1945.
Here’s a short breakdown on what I see in this design: The Model 45A is a modern-looking “Bullpup” design, with a noticeably long barrel. A Browning Automatic Rifle magazine has been used and we can safely assume that the Model 45A was chambered for standard .30 caliber ammunition. The pistol grip is futuristic looking for 1945, but the receiver cover looks rather crude and flimsy, and this is likely why the Model 45A is probably not a live gun. The scope integrated inside the carry handle (very much reminiscent of a modern Steyr-AUG design) is unidentified. The Model 45A is even equipped to launch the M9A1 anti-tank rifle grenade. Produced in the Philippines, it carries with it that country’s long history of hand-made firearms and unique designs.
As a photo researcher, I found it quite curious that so many photos were taken of the Model 45A, and that the official captions on the Signal Corps images provided so much information (such as it was) about the rifle. Ultimately, it had the “feel” of a marketing effort. Apparently the Ordnance crew that developed this concept didn’t realize that any designs you come up with while in the employ of Uncle Sam are destined to be US Government property without additional compensation to the designer. If they had dreamed of financial gain by selling the plans of the Model 45A to the Army, it never happened—and never really had any chance of happening anyway.
I find the futuristic appearance of the weapon to be particularly interesting, and the Model 45A goes to prove an important point: American ingenuity knows no bounds!
If ever there was a “forgotten weapon” it is the Model 45A. Maybe one of the readers of this site can share shed some more light on this fascinating concept, developed in the field all those years ago. US Model 45A « Forgotten Weapons
by Tom Laemlein
A couple of years ago, I wrote a short article for Small Arms Review magazine on the strangely futuristic “Model 45A”, which was the subject of a group of photos by a US Army photographer. Apparently this rifle was a one-off developed by a group of Army Ordnance men stationed in the Philippines during 1945, and as bizarre as its modern features the Model 45A attracted the attention of a Signal Corps photographer. The rifle ended up being the subject of at least two “photo-shoots” in immediate post-war Manila.
Although there is no way to know for sure, it is unlikely that Model 45A was actually capable of firing. That has been the opinion of several gun writers—at least given the only evidence we have, which are the photos. Consensus of opinion on the Model 45A has been consistent in at least one aspect: the rifle concept presents many forward-thinking ideas in small arms design. The elusive idea of creating an infantry arm that fulfills multiple roles using the same cartridge was alive and well in 1945.
Here’s a short breakdown on what I see in this design: The Model 45A is a modern-looking “Bullpup” design, with a noticeably long barrel. A Browning Automatic Rifle magazine has been used and we can safely assume that the Model 45A was chambered for standard .30 caliber ammunition. The pistol grip is futuristic looking for 1945, but the receiver cover looks rather crude and flimsy, and this is likely why the Model 45A is probably not a live gun. The scope integrated inside the carry handle (very much reminiscent of a modern Steyr-AUG design) is unidentified. The Model 45A is even equipped to launch the M9A1 anti-tank rifle grenade. Produced in the Philippines, it carries with it that country’s long history of hand-made firearms and unique designs.
As a photo researcher, I found it quite curious that so many photos were taken of the Model 45A, and that the official captions on the Signal Corps images provided so much information (such as it was) about the rifle. Ultimately, it had the “feel” of a marketing effort. Apparently the Ordnance crew that developed this concept didn’t realize that any designs you come up with while in the employ of Uncle Sam are destined to be US Government property without additional compensation to the designer. If they had dreamed of financial gain by selling the plans of the Model 45A to the Army, it never happened—and never really had any chance of happening anyway.
I find the futuristic appearance of the weapon to be particularly interesting, and the Model 45A goes to prove an important point: American ingenuity knows no bounds!
If ever there was a “forgotten weapon” it is the Model 45A. Maybe one of the readers of this site can share shed some more light on this fascinating concept, developed in the field all those years ago. US Model 45A « Forgotten Weapons
by Tom Laemlein
A couple of years ago, I wrote a short article for Small Arms Review magazine on the strangely futuristic “Model 45A”, which was the subject of a group of photos by a US Army photographer. Apparently this rifle was a one-off developed by a group of Army Ordnance men stationed in the Philippines during 1945, and as bizarre as its modern features the Model 45A attracted the attention of a Signal Corps photographer. The rifle ended up being the subject of at least two “photo-shoots” in immediate post-war Manila.
Although there is no way to know for sure, it is unlikely that Model 45A was actually capable of firing. That has been the opinion of several gun writers—at least given the only evidence we have, which are the photos. Consensus of opinion on the Model 45A has been consistent in at least one aspect: the rifle concept presents many forward-thinking ideas in small arms design. The elusive idea of creating an infantry arm that fulfills multiple roles using the same cartridge was alive and well in 1945.
Here’s a short breakdown on what I see in this design: The Model 45A is a modern-looking “Bullpup” design, with a noticeably long barrel. A Browning Automatic Rifle magazine has been used and we can safely assume that the Model 45A was chambered for standard .30 caliber ammunition. The pistol grip is futuristic looking for 1945, but the receiver cover looks rather crude and flimsy, and this is likely why the Model 45A is probably not a live gun. The scope integrated inside the carry handle (very much reminiscent of a modern Steyr-AUG design) is unidentified. The Model 45A is even equipped to launch the M9A1 anti-tank rifle grenade. Produced in the Philippines, it carries with it that country’s long history of hand-made firearms and unique designs.
As a photo researcher, I found it quite curious that so many photos were taken of the Model 45A, and that the official captions on the Signal Corps images provided so much information (such as it was) about the rifle. Ultimately, it had the “feel” of a marketing effort. Apparently the Ordnance crew that developed this concept didn’t realize that any designs you come up with while in the employ of Uncle Sam are destined to be US Government property without additional compensation to the designer. If they had dreamed of financial gain by selling the plans of the Model 45A to the Army, it never happened—and never really had any chance of happening anyway.
I find the futuristic appearance of the weapon to be particularly interesting, and the Model 45A goes to prove an important point: American ingenuity knows no bounds!
If ever there was a “forgotten weapon” it is the Model 45A. Maybe one of the readers of this site can share shed some more light on this fascinating concept, developed in the field all those years ago. US Model 45A « Forgotten Weapons
by Tom Laemlein
A couple of years ago, I wrote a short article for Small Arms Review magazine on the strangely futuristic “Model 45A”, which was the subject of a group of photos by a US Army photographer. Apparently this rifle was a one-off developed by a group of Army Ordnance men stationed in the Philippines during 1945, and as bizarre as its modern features the Model 45A attracted the attention of a Signal Corps photographer. The rifle ended up being the subject of at least two “photo-shoots” in immediate post-war Manila.
Although there is no way to know for sure, it is unlikely that Model 45A was actually capable of firing. That has been the opinion of several gun writers—at least given the only evidence we have, which are the photos. Consensus of opinion on the Model 45A has been consistent in at least one aspect: the rifle concept presents many forward-thinking ideas in small arms design. The elusive idea of creating an infantry arm that fulfills multiple roles using the same cartridge was alive and well in 1945.
Here’s a short breakdown on what I see in this design: The Model 45A is a modern-looking “Bullpup” design, with a noticeably long barrel. A Browning Automatic Rifle magazine has been used and we can safely assume that the Model 45A was chambered for standard .30 caliber ammunition. The pistol grip is futuristic looking for 1945, but the receiver cover looks rather crude and flimsy, and this is likely why the Model 45A is probably not a live gun. The scope integrated inside the carry handle (very much reminiscent of a modern Steyr-AUG design) is unidentified. The Model 45A is even equipped to launch the M9A1 anti-tank rifle grenade. Produced in the Philippines, it carries with it that country’s long history of hand-made firearms and unique designs.
As a photo researcher, I found it quite curious that so many photos were taken of the Model 45A, and that the official captions on the Signal Corps images provided so much information (such as it was) about the rifle. Ultimately, it had the “feel” of a marketing effort. Apparently the Ordnance crew that developed this concept didn’t realize that any designs you come up with while in the employ of Uncle Sam are destined to be US Government property without additional compensation to the designer. If they had dreamed of financial gain by selling the plans of the Model 45A to the Army, it never happened—and never really had any chance of happening anyway.
I find the futuristic appearance of the weapon to be particularly interesting, and the Model 45A goes to prove an important point: American ingenuity knows no bounds!
If ever there was a “forgotten weapon” it is the Model 45A. Maybe one of the readers of this site can share shed some more light on this fascinating concept, developed in the field all those years ago. US Model 45A « Forgotten Weapons
by Tom Laemlein
A couple of years ago, I wrote a short article for Small Arms Review magazine on the strangely futuristic “Model 45A”, which was the subject of a group of photos by a US Army photographer. Apparently this rifle was a one-off developed by a group of Army Ordnance men stationed in the Philippines during 1945, and as bizarre as its modern features the Model 45A attracted the attention of a Signal Corps photographer. The rifle ended up being the subject of at least two “photo-shoots” in immediate post-war Manila.
Although there is no way to know for sure, it is unlikely that Model 45A was actually capable of firing. That has been the opinion of several gun writers—at least given the only evidence we have, which are the photos. Consensus of opinion on the Model 45A has been consistent in at least one aspect: the rifle concept presents many forward-thinking ideas in small arms design. The elusive idea of creating an infantry arm that fulfills multiple roles using the same cartridge was alive and well in 1945.
Here’s a short breakdown on what I see in this design: The Model 45A is a modern-looking “Bullpup” design, with a noticeably long barrel. A Browning Automatic Rifle magazine has been used and we can safely assume that the Model 45A was chambered for standard .30 caliber ammunition. The pistol grip is futuristic looking for 1945, but the receiver cover looks rather crude and flimsy, and this is likely why the Model 45A is probably not a live gun. The scope integrated inside the carry handle (very much reminiscent of a modern Steyr-AUG design) is unidentified. The Model 45A is even equipped to launch the M9A1 anti-tank rifle grenade. Produced in the Philippines, it carries with it that country’s long history of hand-made firearms and unique designs.
As a photo researcher, I found it quite curious that so many photos were taken of the Model 45A, and that the official captions on the Signal Corps images provided so much information (such as it was) about the rifle. Ultimately, it had the “feel” of a marketing effort. Apparently the Ordnance crew that developed this concept didn’t realize that any designs you come up with while in the employ of Uncle Sam are destined to be US Government property without additional compensation to the designer. If they had dreamed of financial gain by selling the plans of the Model 45A to the Army, it never happened—and never really had any chance of happening anyway.
I find the futuristic appearance of the weapon to be particularly interesting, and the Model 45A goes to prove an important point: American ingenuity knows no bounds!
If ever there was a “forgotten weapon” it is the Model 45A. Maybe one of the readers of this site can share shed some more light on this fascinating concept, developed in the field all those years ago. US Model 45A « Forgotten Weapons
by Tom Laemlein
A couple of years ago, I wrote a short article for Small Arms Review magazine on the strangely futuristic “Model 45A”, which was the subject of a group of photos by a US Army photographer. Apparently this rifle was a one-off developed by a group of Army Ordnance men stationed in the Philippines during 1945, and as bizarre as its modern features the Model 45A attracted the attention of a Signal Corps photographer. The rifle ended up being the subject of at least two “photo-shoots” in immediate post-war Manila.
Although there is no way to know for sure, it is unlikely that Model 45A was actually capable of firing. That has been the opinion of several gun writers—at least given the only evidence we have, which are the photos. Consensus of opinion on the Model 45A has been consistent in at least one aspect: the rifle concept presents many forward-thinking ideas in small arms design. The elusive idea of creating an infantry arm that fulfills multiple roles using the same cartridge was alive and well in 1945.
Here’s a short breakdown on what I see in this design: The Model 45A is a modern-looking “Bullpup” design, with a noticeably long barrel. A Browning Automatic Rifle magazine has been used and we can safely assume that the Model 45A was chambered for standard .30 caliber ammunition. The pistol grip is futuristic looking for 1945, but the receiver cover looks rather crude and flimsy, and this is likely why the Model 45A is probably not a live gun. The scope integrated inside the carry handle (very much reminiscent of a modern Steyr-AUG design) is unidentified. The Model 45A is even equipped to launch the M9A1 anti-tank rifle grenade. Produced in the Philippines, it carries with it that country’s long history of hand-made firearms and unique designs.
As a photo researcher, I found it quite curious that so many photos were taken of the Model 45A, and that the official captions on the Signal Corps images provided so much information (such as it was) about the rifle. Ultimately, it had the “feel” of a marketing effort. Apparently the Ordnance crew that developed this concept didn’t realize that any designs you come up with while in the employ of Uncle Sam are destined to be US Government property without additional compensation to the designer. If they had dreamed of financial gain by selling the plans of the Model 45A to the Army, it never happened—and never really had any chance of happening anyway.
I find the futuristic appearance of the weapon to be particularly interesting, and the Model 45A goes to prove an important point: American ingenuity knows no bounds!
If ever there was a “forgotten weapon” it is the Model 45A. Maybe one of the readers of this site can share shed some more light on this fascinating concept, developed in the field all those years ago.

US Model 45A « Forgotten Weapons

by Tom Laemlein

A couple of years ago, I wrote a short article for Small Arms Review magazine on the strangely futuristic “Model 45A”, which was the subject of a group of photos by a US Army photographer. Apparently this rifle was a one-off developed by a group of Army Ordnance men stationed in the Philippines during 1945, and as bizarre as its modern features the Model 45A attracted the attention of a Signal Corps photographer. The rifle ended up being the subject of at least two “photo-shoots” in immediate post-war Manila.

Although there is no way to know for sure, it is unlikely that Model 45A was actually capable of firing. That has been the opinion of several gun writers—at least given the only evidence we have, which are the photos. Consensus of opinion on the Model 45A has been consistent in at least one aspect: the rifle concept presents many forward-thinking ideas in small arms design. The elusive idea of creating an infantry arm that fulfills multiple roles using the same cartridge was alive and well in 1945.

Here’s a short breakdown on what I see in this design: The Model 45A is a modern-looking “Bullpup” design, with a noticeably long barrel. A Browning Automatic Rifle magazine has been used and we can safely assume that the Model 45A was chambered for standard .30 caliber ammunition. The pistol grip is futuristic looking for 1945, but the receiver cover looks rather crude and flimsy, and this is likely why the Model 45A is probably not a live gun. The scope integrated inside the carry handle (very much reminiscent of a modern Steyr-AUG design) is unidentified. The Model 45A is even equipped to launch the M9A1 anti-tank rifle grenade. Produced in the Philippines, it carries with it that country’s long history of hand-made firearms and unique designs.

As a photo researcher, I found it quite curious that so many photos were taken of the Model 45A, and that the official captions on the Signal Corps images provided so much information (such as it was) about the rifle. Ultimately, it had the “feel” of a marketing effort. Apparently the Ordnance crew that developed this concept didn’t realize that any designs you come up with while in the employ of Uncle Sam are destined to be US Government property without additional compensation to the designer. If they had dreamed of financial gain by selling the plans of the Model 45A to the Army, it never happened—and never really had any chance of happening anyway.

I find the futuristic appearance of the weapon to be particularly interesting, and the Model 45A goes to prove an important point: American ingenuity knows no bounds!

If ever there was a “forgotten weapon” it is the Model 45A. Maybe one of the readers of this site can share shed some more light on this fascinating concept, developed in the field all those years ago.

wolflun:

Illustration: Yoshihiko Umakoshi (馬越嘉彦)

wannabeanimator:

Bambi and Thumper on Ice | Deja View

While working on Bambi, Frank [Thomas] was looking forward to animating the sequence with Bambi having trouble moving on ice, while Thumper performed like a professional skater. Then word got around that Walt Disney was thinking about cutting this section from the film. To prove the entertainment possibilities in the sequence Frank quickly drew a series of sketches and had them put on to film.  The result convinced Walt that these character rich situations needed to be part of the movie.

wannabeanimator:

Bambi and Thumper on Ice | Deja View

While working on Bambi, Frank [Thomas] was looking forward to animating the sequence with Bambi having trouble moving on ice, while Thumper performed like a professional skater. Then word got around that Walt Disney was thinking about cutting this section from the film. To prove the entertainment possibilities in the sequence Frank quickly drew a series of sketches and had them put on to film.  The result convinced Walt that these character rich situations needed to be part of the movie.

wannabeanimator:

Bambi and Thumper on Ice | Deja View

While working on Bambi, Frank [Thomas] was looking forward to animating the sequence with Bambi having trouble moving on ice, while Thumper performed like a professional skater. Then word got around that Walt Disney was thinking about cutting this section from the film. To prove the entertainment possibilities in the sequence Frank quickly drew a series of sketches and had them put on to film.  The result convinced Walt that these character rich situations needed to be part of the movie.

wannabeanimator:

Bambi and Thumper on Ice | Deja View

While working on Bambi, Frank [Thomas] was looking forward to animating the sequence with Bambi having trouble moving on ice, while Thumper performed like a professional skater. Then word got around that Walt Disney was thinking about cutting this section from the film. To prove the entertainment possibilities in the sequence Frank quickly drew a series of sketches and had them put on to film.  The result convinced Walt that these character rich situations needed to be part of the movie.

wannabeanimator:

Bambi and Thumper on Ice | Deja View

While working on Bambi, Frank [Thomas] was looking forward to animating the sequence with Bambi having trouble moving on ice, while Thumper performed like a professional skater. Then word got around that Walt Disney was thinking about cutting this section from the film. To prove the entertainment possibilities in the sequence Frank quickly drew a series of sketches and had them put on to film.  The result convinced Walt that these character rich situations needed to be part of the movie.

歴史群像 2014年4月号