Updated: Dutch Uzi vehicle mount. [Archive] - UZI Talk Forums Updated: Dutch Uzi vehicle mount. [Archive] - UZI Talk Forums Updated: Dutch Uzi vehicle mount. [Archive] - UZI Talk Forums Updated: Dutch Uzi vehicle mount. [Archive] - UZI Talk Forums Updated: Dutch Uzi vehicle mount. [Archive] - UZI Talk Forums Updated: Dutch Uzi vehicle mount. [Archive] - UZI Talk Forums
Noble Ledger: Internasjonale styrker
6500 soldater fra Tyskland, Nederland, Danmark, USA og Norge deltar på øvelsen. Her kan du se noen av de internasjonale styrkene. Noble Ledger: Internasjonale styrker
6500 soldater fra Tyskland, Nederland, Danmark, USA og Norge deltar på øvelsen. Her kan du se noen av de internasjonale styrkene. Noble Ledger: Internasjonale styrker
6500 soldater fra Tyskland, Nederland, Danmark, USA og Norge deltar på øvelsen. Her kan du se noen av de internasjonale styrkene. Noble Ledger: Internasjonale styrker
6500 soldater fra Tyskland, Nederland, Danmark, USA og Norge deltar på øvelsen. Her kan du se noen av de internasjonale styrkene. Noble Ledger: Internasjonale styrker
6500 soldater fra Tyskland, Nederland, Danmark, USA og Norge deltar på øvelsen. Her kan du se noen av de internasjonale styrkene.

Noble Ledger: Internasjonale styrker

6500 soldater fra Tyskland, Nederland, Danmark, USA og Norge deltar på øvelsen. Her kan du se noen av de internasjonale styrkene.

Musée National d’Histoire Militaire
The National Military History Museum or Musée National d’Histoire Militaire, in Diekirch, Luxembourg, Musée National d’Histoire Militaire
The National Military History Museum or Musée National d’Histoire Militaire, in Diekirch, Luxembourg, Musée National d’Histoire Militaire
The National Military History Museum or Musée National d’Histoire Militaire, in Diekirch, Luxembourg, Musée National d’Histoire Militaire
The National Military History Museum or Musée National d’Histoire Militaire, in Diekirch, Luxembourg, Musée National d’Histoire Militaire
The National Military History Museum or Musée National d’Histoire Militaire, in Diekirch, Luxembourg, Musée National d’Histoire Militaire
The National Military History Museum or Musée National d’Histoire Militaire, in Diekirch, Luxembourg, Musée National d’Histoire Militaire
The National Military History Museum or Musée National d’Histoire Militaire, in Diekirch, Luxembourg, Musée National d’Histoire Militaire
The National Military History Museum or Musée National d’Histoire Militaire, in Diekirch, Luxembourg, Musée National d’Histoire Militaire
The National Military History Museum or Musée National d’Histoire Militaire, in Diekirch, Luxembourg, Musée National d’Histoire Militaire
The National Military History Museum or Musée National d’Histoire Militaire, in Diekirch, Luxembourg,

Musée National d’Histoire Militaire

The National Military History Museum or Musée National d’Histoire Militaire, in Diekirch, Luxembourg,

Musée National d’Histoire Militaire
The National Military History Museum or Musée National d’Histoire Militaire, in Diekirch, Luxembourg, Musée National d’Histoire Militaire
The National Military History Museum or Musée National d’Histoire Militaire, in Diekirch, Luxembourg, Musée National d’Histoire Militaire
The National Military History Museum or Musée National d’Histoire Militaire, in Diekirch, Luxembourg, Musée National d’Histoire Militaire
The National Military History Museum or Musée National d’Histoire Militaire, in Diekirch, Luxembourg, Musée National d’Histoire Militaire
The National Military History Museum or Musée National d’Histoire Militaire, in Diekirch, Luxembourg, Musée National d’Histoire Militaire
The National Military History Museum or Musée National d’Histoire Militaire, in Diekirch, Luxembourg, Musée National d’Histoire Militaire
The National Military History Museum or Musée National d’Histoire Militaire, in Diekirch, Luxembourg, Musée National d’Histoire Militaire
The National Military History Museum or Musée National d’Histoire Militaire, in Diekirch, Luxembourg, Musée National d’Histoire Militaire
The National Military History Museum or Musée National d’Histoire Militaire, in Diekirch, Luxembourg,

Musée National d’Histoire Militaire

The National Military History Museum or Musée National d’Histoire Militaire, in Diekirch, Luxembourg,

First Look: Ruger LCR 9mm Revolver | Guns & Ammo
Ruger has extended its LCR line of revolvers to include a 9mm Luger offering that loads and fires from moon clips.
This 17.20-ounce double-action wheel gun features a polymer fire control housing that reduces both overall weight and felt recoil. Its monolithic frame is made from blackened 400-series stainless steel, while its 5-round cylinder has extensive fluting and an Ionbond finish for added durability. The LCR 9mm’s stainless steel barrel measures 1.875-inches and gives the revolver a 6.5-inch overall length.
A replaceable front sight and integral U-notch rear sight ride atop the frame, and Hogue Tamer Monogrips provide a cushioned grip for recoil reduction. A set of three included moon clips make for easy loading and the LCR 9mm can be fired with moon clips attached to the rounds. Upon initial drop testing, the moon clips maintain their grip with loaded rounds when dropped onto the ground.
We expect this revolver to become an excellent choice for a primary carry gun or a backup gun for people who carry 9mm semiautos, especially because it will run with +P ammunition.
The Ruger LCR 9mm is available now for $599 MSRP. Check out more photos and information below.
Read more: http://www.gunsandammo.com/first-look/first-look-ruger-lcr-9mm-revolver/#ixzz3E7B3qPqz First Look: Ruger LCR 9mm Revolver | Guns & Ammo
Ruger has extended its LCR line of revolvers to include a 9mm Luger offering that loads and fires from moon clips.
This 17.20-ounce double-action wheel gun features a polymer fire control housing that reduces both overall weight and felt recoil. Its monolithic frame is made from blackened 400-series stainless steel, while its 5-round cylinder has extensive fluting and an Ionbond finish for added durability. The LCR 9mm’s stainless steel barrel measures 1.875-inches and gives the revolver a 6.5-inch overall length.
A replaceable front sight and integral U-notch rear sight ride atop the frame, and Hogue Tamer Monogrips provide a cushioned grip for recoil reduction. A set of three included moon clips make for easy loading and the LCR 9mm can be fired with moon clips attached to the rounds. Upon initial drop testing, the moon clips maintain their grip with loaded rounds when dropped onto the ground.
We expect this revolver to become an excellent choice for a primary carry gun or a backup gun for people who carry 9mm semiautos, especially because it will run with +P ammunition.
The Ruger LCR 9mm is available now for $599 MSRP. Check out more photos and information below.
Read more: http://www.gunsandammo.com/first-look/first-look-ruger-lcr-9mm-revolver/#ixzz3E7B3qPqz First Look: Ruger LCR 9mm Revolver | Guns & Ammo
Ruger has extended its LCR line of revolvers to include a 9mm Luger offering that loads and fires from moon clips.
This 17.20-ounce double-action wheel gun features a polymer fire control housing that reduces both overall weight and felt recoil. Its monolithic frame is made from blackened 400-series stainless steel, while its 5-round cylinder has extensive fluting and an Ionbond finish for added durability. The LCR 9mm’s stainless steel barrel measures 1.875-inches and gives the revolver a 6.5-inch overall length.
A replaceable front sight and integral U-notch rear sight ride atop the frame, and Hogue Tamer Monogrips provide a cushioned grip for recoil reduction. A set of three included moon clips make for easy loading and the LCR 9mm can be fired with moon clips attached to the rounds. Upon initial drop testing, the moon clips maintain their grip with loaded rounds when dropped onto the ground.
We expect this revolver to become an excellent choice for a primary carry gun or a backup gun for people who carry 9mm semiautos, especially because it will run with +P ammunition.
The Ruger LCR 9mm is available now for $599 MSRP. Check out more photos and information below.
Read more: http://www.gunsandammo.com/first-look/first-look-ruger-lcr-9mm-revolver/#ixzz3E7B3qPqz First Look: Ruger LCR 9mm Revolver | Guns & Ammo
Ruger has extended its LCR line of revolvers to include a 9mm Luger offering that loads and fires from moon clips.
This 17.20-ounce double-action wheel gun features a polymer fire control housing that reduces both overall weight and felt recoil. Its monolithic frame is made from blackened 400-series stainless steel, while its 5-round cylinder has extensive fluting and an Ionbond finish for added durability. The LCR 9mm’s stainless steel barrel measures 1.875-inches and gives the revolver a 6.5-inch overall length.
A replaceable front sight and integral U-notch rear sight ride atop the frame, and Hogue Tamer Monogrips provide a cushioned grip for recoil reduction. A set of three included moon clips make for easy loading and the LCR 9mm can be fired with moon clips attached to the rounds. Upon initial drop testing, the moon clips maintain their grip with loaded rounds when dropped onto the ground.
We expect this revolver to become an excellent choice for a primary carry gun or a backup gun for people who carry 9mm semiautos, especially because it will run with +P ammunition.
The Ruger LCR 9mm is available now for $599 MSRP. Check out more photos and information below.
Read more: http://www.gunsandammo.com/first-look/first-look-ruger-lcr-9mm-revolver/#ixzz3E7B3qPqz

First Look: Ruger LCR 9mm Revolver | Guns & Ammo

Ruger has extended its LCR line of revolvers to include a 9mm Luger offering that loads and fires from moon clips.

This 17.20-ounce double-action wheel gun features a polymer fire control housing that reduces both overall weight and felt recoil. Its monolithic frame is made from blackened 400-series stainless steel, while its 5-round cylinder has extensive fluting and an Ionbond finish for added durability. The LCR 9mm’s stainless steel barrel measures 1.875-inches and gives the revolver a 6.5-inch overall length.

A replaceable front sight and integral U-notch rear sight ride atop the frame, and Hogue Tamer Monogrips provide a cushioned grip for recoil reduction. A set of three included moon clips make for easy loading and the LCR 9mm can be fired with moon clips attached to the rounds. Upon initial drop testing, the moon clips maintain their grip with loaded rounds when dropped onto the ground.

We expect this revolver to become an excellent choice for a primary carry gun or a backup gun for people who carry 9mm semiautos, especially because it will run with +P ammunition.

The Ruger LCR 9mm is available now for $599 MSRP. Check out more photos and information below.

Read more: http://www.gunsandammo.com/first-look/first-look-ruger-lcr-9mm-revolver/#ixzz3E7B3qPqz

ゲゲゲの鬼太郎 セレクション 「ニャニャニャのネコ娘」 - ゲゲゲの鬼太郎ブログ - Yahoo!ブログ ゲゲゲの鬼太郎 セレクション 「ニャニャニャのネコ娘」 - ゲゲゲの鬼太郎ブログ - Yahoo!ブログ
好きなものは好きだから好きになる: ゲゲゲの鬼太郎 好きなものは好きだから好きになる: ゲゲゲの鬼太郎
HK416A5 HK416A5 HK416A5 HK416A5
A Brief Overview of the Egyptian Hakim Rifle : : C&Rsenal
Rifle:Hakim Rifle
Manufacturer:Maadi Factory
Cartridge:7.92x57mm
Overall Length:47.8″
Action:Direct Impingement
Barrel Length:25.1″
Magazine:10-rnds dtch box
Weight:9.8 lb

Unhappy with their FN-49 rifles and unwilling to rely on foreign powers, Egypt wanted a new rifle.  So they looked to Sweden for designs and tooling to start their own production line.

The Egyptian Revolution of 1952 replaced the kingdom with a republic focused on modernization and reform.  Many external powers opposed this change and so Egypt was motivated to begin domestic military production in order to secure its own supplies.  Following WWII, Egypt had taken advantage of surplus German armament and equipment and standardized on the 7.92x57mm rifle cartridge.  Egypt had been an early adopter of the Belgian FN-49 rifle but it was not, apparently, particularly favored by the military.  So the new republic licensed a design and purchased tooling from Husqvarna in Sweden in order to begin local manufacturing.
Egypt’s new rifle was derived from the Swedish Ljungman Ag m/42 semi-automatic rifle using a direct impingement gas system.  This WWII-era design uses a tilting bolt, which seats with a locking surface at the rear bottom of the bolt nested into the receiver.  A carrier rides over the bolt and when driven forward presses the rear down, into lock; when driven back it lifts the rear of the bolt out of lock.  Firing a cartridge passes excess gas down the barrel and a portion of this is bled into a gas tube.  This gas is directed back down the barrel and into the face of the carrier, causing it to be driven backwards, again, unlocking the action.  The action is fed from a detachable box magazine but could also be loaded with stripper clips.  Readying the rifle is actually somewhat unusual.  To close the bolt and chamber the first round one must grip the sliding cover and shove it all the way forward, then pull it back.  Once this cover is rearward again, the carrier and bolt will snap shut.  This has the interesting property of preventing users from “riding the bolt.”  The safety switch is at the rear of the action.
Adopted in Egypt as the “Hakim” this new Ljungman was adapted to fire the 7.92mm cartridge, fitted with an adjustable gas valve, and a prominent muzzle brake.  Production began at the state’s Factory 54 (later the Maadi Factory) in 1955 and ran until roughly 1959.  Despite being reliable, serviceable, and powerful, the Hakim proved heavy and cumbersome in the face of changing doctrine of warfare.  Egypt looked to settle in with the AK-47 and the 7.62x39mm cartridge of its neighbors and so the unwieldy 7.92mm had to go.  For roughly one year a carbine variant of the Hakim, the Rashid, was produced in this new cartridge. Hakim rifles continued to serve Egypt in second line and training roles until completely displaced by the AK.

A Brief Overview of the Egyptian Hakim Rifle : : C&Rsenal
Rifle:Hakim Rifle
Manufacturer:Maadi Factory
Cartridge:7.92x57mm
Overall Length:47.8″
Action:Direct Impingement
Barrel Length:25.1″
Magazine:10-rnds dtch box
Weight:9.8 lb

Unhappy with their FN-49 rifles and unwilling to rely on foreign powers, Egypt wanted a new rifle.  So they looked to Sweden for designs and tooling to start their own production line.

The Egyptian Revolution of 1952 replaced the kingdom with a republic focused on modernization and reform.  Many external powers opposed this change and so Egypt was motivated to begin domestic military production in order to secure its own supplies.  Following WWII, Egypt had taken advantage of surplus German armament and equipment and standardized on the 7.92x57mm rifle cartridge.  Egypt had been an early adopter of the Belgian FN-49 rifle but it was not, apparently, particularly favored by the military.  So the new republic licensed a design and purchased tooling from Husqvarna in Sweden in order to begin local manufacturing.
Egypt’s new rifle was derived from the Swedish Ljungman Ag m/42 semi-automatic rifle using a direct impingement gas system.  This WWII-era design uses a tilting bolt, which seats with a locking surface at the rear bottom of the bolt nested into the receiver.  A carrier rides over the bolt and when driven forward presses the rear down, into lock; when driven back it lifts the rear of the bolt out of lock.  Firing a cartridge passes excess gas down the barrel and a portion of this is bled into a gas tube.  This gas is directed back down the barrel and into the face of the carrier, causing it to be driven backwards, again, unlocking the action.  The action is fed from a detachable box magazine but could also be loaded with stripper clips.  Readying the rifle is actually somewhat unusual.  To close the bolt and chamber the first round one must grip the sliding cover and shove it all the way forward, then pull it back.  Once this cover is rearward again, the carrier and bolt will snap shut.  This has the interesting property of preventing users from “riding the bolt.”  The safety switch is at the rear of the action.
Adopted in Egypt as the “Hakim” this new Ljungman was adapted to fire the 7.92mm cartridge, fitted with an adjustable gas valve, and a prominent muzzle brake.  Production began at the state’s Factory 54 (later the Maadi Factory) in 1955 and ran until roughly 1959.  Despite being reliable, serviceable, and powerful, the Hakim proved heavy and cumbersome in the face of changing doctrine of warfare.  Egypt looked to settle in with the AK-47 and the 7.62x39mm cartridge of its neighbors and so the unwieldy 7.92mm had to go.  For roughly one year a carbine variant of the Hakim, the Rashid, was produced in this new cartridge. Hakim rifles continued to serve Egypt in second line and training roles until completely displaced by the AK.

A Brief Overview of the Egyptian Hakim Rifle : : C&Rsenal
Rifle:Hakim Rifle
Manufacturer:Maadi Factory
Cartridge:7.92x57mm
Overall Length:47.8″
Action:Direct Impingement
Barrel Length:25.1″
Magazine:10-rnds dtch box
Weight:9.8 lb

Unhappy with their FN-49 rifles and unwilling to rely on foreign powers, Egypt wanted a new rifle.  So they looked to Sweden for designs and tooling to start their own production line.

The Egyptian Revolution of 1952 replaced the kingdom with a republic focused on modernization and reform.  Many external powers opposed this change and so Egypt was motivated to begin domestic military production in order to secure its own supplies.  Following WWII, Egypt had taken advantage of surplus German armament and equipment and standardized on the 7.92x57mm rifle cartridge.  Egypt had been an early adopter of the Belgian FN-49 rifle but it was not, apparently, particularly favored by the military.  So the new republic licensed a design and purchased tooling from Husqvarna in Sweden in order to begin local manufacturing.
Egypt’s new rifle was derived from the Swedish Ljungman Ag m/42 semi-automatic rifle using a direct impingement gas system.  This WWII-era design uses a tilting bolt, which seats with a locking surface at the rear bottom of the bolt nested into the receiver.  A carrier rides over the bolt and when driven forward presses the rear down, into lock; when driven back it lifts the rear of the bolt out of lock.  Firing a cartridge passes excess gas down the barrel and a portion of this is bled into a gas tube.  This gas is directed back down the barrel and into the face of the carrier, causing it to be driven backwards, again, unlocking the action.  The action is fed from a detachable box magazine but could also be loaded with stripper clips.  Readying the rifle is actually somewhat unusual.  To close the bolt and chamber the first round one must grip the sliding cover and shove it all the way forward, then pull it back.  Once this cover is rearward again, the carrier and bolt will snap shut.  This has the interesting property of preventing users from “riding the bolt.”  The safety switch is at the rear of the action.
Adopted in Egypt as the “Hakim” this new Ljungman was adapted to fire the 7.92mm cartridge, fitted with an adjustable gas valve, and a prominent muzzle brake.  Production began at the state’s Factory 54 (later the Maadi Factory) in 1955 and ran until roughly 1959.  Despite being reliable, serviceable, and powerful, the Hakim proved heavy and cumbersome in the face of changing doctrine of warfare.  Egypt looked to settle in with the AK-47 and the 7.62x39mm cartridge of its neighbors and so the unwieldy 7.92mm had to go.  For roughly one year a carbine variant of the Hakim, the Rashid, was produced in this new cartridge. Hakim rifles continued to serve Egypt in second line and training roles until completely displaced by the AK.

A Brief Overview of the Egyptian Hakim Rifle : : C&Rsenal
Rifle:Hakim Rifle
Manufacturer:Maadi Factory
Cartridge:7.92x57mm
Overall Length:47.8″
Action:Direct Impingement
Barrel Length:25.1″
Magazine:10-rnds dtch box
Weight:9.8 lb

Unhappy with their FN-49 rifles and unwilling to rely on foreign powers, Egypt wanted a new rifle.  So they looked to Sweden for designs and tooling to start their own production line.

The Egyptian Revolution of 1952 replaced the kingdom with a republic focused on modernization and reform.  Many external powers opposed this change and so Egypt was motivated to begin domestic military production in order to secure its own supplies.  Following WWII, Egypt had taken advantage of surplus German armament and equipment and standardized on the 7.92x57mm rifle cartridge.  Egypt had been an early adopter of the Belgian FN-49 rifle but it was not, apparently, particularly favored by the military.  So the new republic licensed a design and purchased tooling from Husqvarna in Sweden in order to begin local manufacturing.
Egypt’s new rifle was derived from the Swedish Ljungman Ag m/42 semi-automatic rifle using a direct impingement gas system.  This WWII-era design uses a tilting bolt, which seats with a locking surface at the rear bottom of the bolt nested into the receiver.  A carrier rides over the bolt and when driven forward presses the rear down, into lock; when driven back it lifts the rear of the bolt out of lock.  Firing a cartridge passes excess gas down the barrel and a portion of this is bled into a gas tube.  This gas is directed back down the barrel and into the face of the carrier, causing it to be driven backwards, again, unlocking the action.  The action is fed from a detachable box magazine but could also be loaded with stripper clips.  Readying the rifle is actually somewhat unusual.  To close the bolt and chamber the first round one must grip the sliding cover and shove it all the way forward, then pull it back.  Once this cover is rearward again, the carrier and bolt will snap shut.  This has the interesting property of preventing users from “riding the bolt.”  The safety switch is at the rear of the action.
Adopted in Egypt as the “Hakim” this new Ljungman was adapted to fire the 7.92mm cartridge, fitted with an adjustable gas valve, and a prominent muzzle brake.  Production began at the state’s Factory 54 (later the Maadi Factory) in 1955 and ran until roughly 1959.  Despite being reliable, serviceable, and powerful, the Hakim proved heavy and cumbersome in the face of changing doctrine of warfare.  Egypt looked to settle in with the AK-47 and the 7.62x39mm cartridge of its neighbors and so the unwieldy 7.92mm had to go.  For roughly one year a carbine variant of the Hakim, the Rashid, was produced in this new cartridge. Hakim rifles continued to serve Egypt in second line and training roles until completely displaced by the AK.

A Brief Overview of the Egyptian Hakim Rifle : : C&Rsenal

Rifle:Hakim Rifle

Manufacturer:Maadi Factory

Cartridge:7.92x57mm

Overall Length:47.8″

Action:Direct Impingement

Barrel Length:25.1″

Magazine:10-rnds dtch box

Weight:9.8 lb

Unhappy with their FN-49 rifles and unwilling to rely on foreign powers, Egypt wanted a new rifle.  So they looked to Sweden for designs and tooling to start their own production line.

The Egyptian Revolution of 1952 replaced the kingdom with a republic focused on modernization and reform.  Many external powers opposed this change and so Egypt was motivated to begin domestic military production in order to secure its own supplies.  Following WWII, Egypt had taken advantage of surplus German armament and equipment and standardized on the 7.92x57mm rifle cartridge.  Egypt had been an early adopter of the Belgian FN-49 rifle but it was not, apparently, particularly favored by the military.  So the new republic licensed a design and purchased tooling from Husqvarna in Sweden in order to begin local manufacturing.

Egypt’s new rifle was derived from the Swedish Ljungman Ag m/42 semi-automatic rifle using a direct impingement gas system.  This WWII-era design uses a tilting bolt, which seats with a locking surface at the rear bottom of the bolt nested into the receiver.  A carrier rides over the bolt and when driven forward presses the rear down, into lock; when driven back it lifts the rear of the bolt out of lock.  Firing a cartridge passes excess gas down the barrel and a portion of this is bled into a gas tube.  This gas is directed back down the barrel and into the face of the carrier, causing it to be driven backwards, again, unlocking the action.  The action is fed from a detachable box magazine but could also be loaded with stripper clips.  Readying the rifle is actually somewhat unusual.  To close the bolt and chamber the first round one must grip the sliding cover and shove it all the way forward, then pull it back.  Once this cover is rearward again, the carrier and bolt will snap shut.  This has the interesting property of preventing users from “riding the bolt.”  The safety switch is at the rear of the action.

Adopted in Egypt as the “Hakim” this new Ljungman was adapted to fire the 7.92mm cartridge, fitted with an adjustable gas valve, and a prominent muzzle brake.  Production began at the state’s Factory 54 (later the Maadi Factory) in 1955 and ran until roughly 1959.  Despite being reliable, serviceable, and powerful, the Hakim proved heavy and cumbersome in the face of changing doctrine of warfare.  Egypt looked to settle in with the AK-47 and the 7.62x39mm cartridge of its neighbors and so the unwieldy 7.92mm had to go.  For roughly one year a carbine variant of the Hakim, the Rashid, was produced in this new cartridge. Hakim rifles continued to serve Egypt in second line and training roles until completely displaced by the AK.

Paratroopers Cycling Over Arnhem Bridge | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

UK Ministry of Defence
Paratroopers Cycling Over Arnhem Bridge
Soldiers from 51 PARA Squadron, Royal Engineers are pictured cycling over Arnhem Bridge in the Netherlands.

Airborne Forces joined this weekend ( 20th-21st Sept 2014) to attend a series of commemorative events in and around the Dutch town of Arnhem.

Veterans, many aged in their 90’s visited cemeteries
to pay respects to fallen comrades.

gana-s2:

Yatterman 2008 episode 54 gana-s2:

Yatterman 2008 episode 54 gana-s2:

Yatterman 2008 episode 54 gana-s2:

Yatterman 2008 episode 54 gana-s2:

Yatterman 2008 episode 54 gana-s2:

Yatterman 2008 episode 54 gana-s2:

Yatterman 2008 episode 54 gana-s2:

Yatterman 2008 episode 54 gana-s2:

Yatterman 2008 episode 54 gana-s2:

Yatterman 2008 episode 54
radiomaru:

Some sketches i did this weekend at Mondo Con radiomaru:

Some sketches i did this weekend at Mondo Con radiomaru:

Some sketches i did this weekend at Mondo Con radiomaru:

Some sketches i did this weekend at Mondo Con radiomaru:

Some sketches i did this weekend at Mondo Con radiomaru:

Some sketches i did this weekend at Mondo Con radiomaru:

Some sketches i did this weekend at Mondo Con radiomaru:

Some sketches i did this weekend at Mondo Con

radiomaru:

Some sketches i did this weekend at Mondo Con